threelinesorless
threelinesorless:

How To Write An Awesome Movie, According To Some Of Hollywood’s Best Writers
Source: @jordanzakarin @buzzfeed
 #screenwriting #film #story
"All aspiring writers have experienced the conception of a story, that little atom of an idea that explodes into a vision of a journey in a big bang “aha!” that rattles the brain. But the difference between the daydreamers and actual filmmakers starts right after that revelatory moment, when the disparate strands of an idea either begin to take shape — and, at some point, migrate over to Final Draft — or just fade away.
BuzzFeed spoke with some of the industry’s top writers and directors to learn how they develop a tiny germ of an idea into award-winning screenplay. They discussed everything from how they get started, to how to sit down and write, and how to balance dialogue and structure.
Here’s the roster of advisers: Richard Linklater (Before Sunrise trilogy, Dazed and Confused); Paul Feig (Freaks and Geeks, Bridesmaids, The Heat); Diablo Cody (Juno, Young Adult); Richard Curtis (Love Actually, About Time, Four Weddings and a Funeral); Nicole Holofcener (Enough Said, Please Give); Michael Weber and Scott Neustadter (500 Days of Summer, The Spectacular Now); David Wain (Wet Hot American Summer, Role Models); Rian Johnson (Looper, Brick); Jeff Nichols (Mud, Take Shelter); Lake Bell (In A World); David Gordon Green (Prince Avalanche, Pineapple Express); Greta Gerwig (Frances Ha); Mark and Jay Duplass (Jeff Who Lives At Home, Cyrus); Nat Faxon and Jim Rash (The Descendants, The Way, Way Back); and Brian Koppelman (Rounders, Oceans Thirteen).

How Ideas Are Born…and Then Stashed Away in Drawers
Richard Linklater: There are a million ideas in a world of stories. Humans are storytelling animals. Everything’s a story, everyone’s got stories, we’re perceiving stories, we’re interested in stories. So to me, the big nut to crack is to how to tell a story, what’s the right way to tell a particular story. So I’m much more interested in narrative construction.
I have a lot of subjects I’m spinning around on that I like and I take notes and read books and have files of things that interest me, but it’s like, What is the movie? How do you crack it? So I like that search.
I think you have to be forever intrigued with the subject matter, the character, or something you’re digging into, you’re rummaging around, something that fascinates you. That process can’t really ever end. If that ends, the movie is over.
Jeff Nichols: I started thinking about Mud in college. [Nichols is now 34.] I’m a very slow writer, and the typing, which most people consider writing, that’s a very last step for me. I heavily outline things. Even before I write anything down, I think about things for a really long time. It’s like a tape ball that you just add detail to, and that’s what happened in this case.
If you’re a friend of mine in Austin, I’ll grab you and take you to lunch and I’ll just vomit this story at you. It’s a really good way to start working the story out. You start talking to people about it, and in the moment, you start to figure out things that connect and make things work, because you have to, because you have to keep telling your story.
Paul Feig: I’m big into notes. I always try to keep a small pad of paper in my pocket and write down any idea that seems interesting. I also type notes into my phone and computer. I basically have ideas written down everywhere. I’ve spent my life reminding myself that, even though I always tell myself I’ll never forget an idea when I think of it, I always forget it, sometimes a minute or two after I’ve thought of it. So, I always force myself to write any idea down. The downside is I have little notebooks scattered around the house and in storage boxes that I never think to look through. Not that any of the ideas in them are gold; most of them are pretty lame. But occasionally, I’ll find a few that link up and create the basis for something worth thinking about.
Diablo Cody: I envy writers who have their shit together! You should see my computer desktop. It’s like 9 million Final Draft documents, pictures of my kids, and photos of haircuts…”
Click below to read the full article.

threelinesorless:

How To Write An Awesome Movie, According To Some Of Hollywood’s Best Writers

Source: @jordanzakarin @buzzfeed

 #screenwriting #film #story

"All aspiring writers have experienced the conception of a story, that little atom of an idea that explodes into a vision of a journey in a big bang “aha!” that rattles the brain. But the difference between the daydreamers and actual filmmakers starts right after that revelatory moment, when the disparate strands of an idea either begin to take shape — and, at some point, migrate over to Final Draft — or just fade away.

BuzzFeed spoke with some of the industry’s top writers and directors to learn how they develop a tiny germ of an idea into award-winning screenplay. They discussed everything from how they get started, to how to sit down and write, and how to balance dialogue and structure.

Here’s the roster of advisers: Richard Linklater (Before Sunrise trilogy, Dazed and Confused); Paul Feig (Freaks and Geeks, Bridesmaids, The Heat); Diablo Cody (Juno, Young Adult); Richard Curtis (Love Actually, About Time, Four Weddings and a Funeral); Nicole Holofcener (Enough Said, Please Give); Michael Weber and Scott Neustadter (500 Days of Summer, The Spectacular Now); David Wain (Wet Hot American Summer, Role Models); Rian Johnson (Looper, Brick); Jeff Nichols (Mud, Take Shelter); Lake Bell (In A World); David Gordon Green (Prince Avalanche, Pineapple Express); Greta Gerwig (Frances Ha); Mark and Jay Duplass (Jeff Who Lives At Home, Cyrus); Nat Faxon and Jim Rash (The Descendants, The Way, Way Back); and Brian Koppelman (Rounders, Oceans Thirteen).

How Ideas Are Born…and Then Stashed Away in Drawers

Richard Linklater: There are a million ideas in a world of stories. Humans are storytelling animals. Everything’s a story, everyone’s got stories, we’re perceiving stories, we’re interested in stories. So to me, the big nut to crack is to how to tell a story, what’s the right way to tell a particular story. So I’m much more interested in narrative construction.

I have a lot of subjects I’m spinning around on that I like and I take notes and read books and have files of things that interest me, but it’s like, What is the movie? How do you crack it? So I like that search.

I think you have to be forever intrigued with the subject matter, the character, or something you’re digging into, you’re rummaging around, something that fascinates you. That process can’t really ever end. If that ends, the movie is over.

Jeff Nichols: I started thinking about Mud in college. [Nichols is now 34.] I’m a very slow writer, and the typing, which most people consider writing, that’s a very last step for me. I heavily outline things. Even before I write anything down, I think about things for a really long time. It’s like a tape ball that you just add detail to, and that’s what happened in this case.

If you’re a friend of mine in Austin, I’ll grab you and take you to lunch and I’ll just vomit this story at you. It’s a really good way to start working the story out. You start talking to people about it, and in the moment, you start to figure out things that connect and make things work, because you have to, because you have to keep telling your story.

Paul Feig: I’m big into notes. I always try to keep a small pad of paper in my pocket and write down any idea that seems interesting. I also type notes into my phone and computer. I basically have ideas written down everywhere. I’ve spent my life reminding myself that, even though I always tell myself I’ll never forget an idea when I think of it, I always forget it, sometimes a minute or two after I’ve thought of it. So, I always force myself to write any idea down. The downside is I have little notebooks scattered around the house and in storage boxes that I never think to look through. Not that any of the ideas in them are gold; most of them are pretty lame. But occasionally, I’ll find a few that link up and create the basis for something worth thinking about.

Diablo Cody: I envy writers who have their shit together! You should see my computer desktop. It’s like 9 million Final Draft documents, pictures of my kids, and photos of haircuts…”

Click below to read the full article.

writerduck
There’s absolutely no reason you can’t write in ANY genre if you are prepared to put the work in. Genre is craft. Craft can be learnt. So learn the conventions of the genre you want to write. Watch all the movies in that genre, big and small; read all the scripts. Go to events, learn about it. Read articles, blogs, soak it all up.
Lucy Vee (via writerduck)
beerosie
Is the script locked when you come to shoot?
No. A lot of times with read-throughs the directors come and say, “I don’t like this. I don’t get this.” My attitude is [locking the script is] like saying to an actor, “You can make this work!” You’re just teeing yourself up for heartbreak. You have to go, “Tell me why. What is it you see? What do you connect to?”

David Fincher talks “House of Cards” and locking in scripts when they shoot.

Filmmaking is about working together to create something, nothing is ever truly locked in, the writer creates the template and design and allows everyone else to colour in the material as well.

http://www.empireonline.com/interviews/interview.asp?IID=1636 

(via beerosie)

writerdirector

writerdirector:

Insight into Richard Linkater’s process. Less practical than theoretical, the article addresses five bastions of great storytelling, according to the consummate independent filmmaker.

Find Your Form First

“There are a lot of stories in the world, and I spend all my time thinking about how to tell them. That, to me, is the cinematic element. That’s the hard part: the right narrative form on every movie is the thing I have to break. New forms have always been a part of my thinking. ‘Could you ever tell a story this way? Why wouldn’t that work?’ I might spend a year on a film like Bernie, figuring out how to tell it. My first film anyone saw was Slacker, and the question there was, ‘Could you tell a story that had no central character but still made sense?’”

Storytelling is Problem Solving

Sometimes bold experiments are born of finding work-arounds to limitations. “I wanted to tell a story about childhood, but I was having trouble landing on what part of it to express. My own thoughts and experiences were scattered throughout different ages, and that’s a limitation, obviously. You can’t just wave a magic wand and your actors are three years older–you have to pick your spot. The idea for Boyhood was one of those ‘aha’ moments that at its core was problem-solving. The film’s structure emerged out of trying to solve the problem of how to express that story over a long period of time. It’s very straightforward, but in a way that hasn’t been done before, because it’s just completely impractical.”

Trust Your Audience

“My stories are actually very cleanly told. There might be something formally challenging, but I’m never trying to confuse anybody. If you establish rules and play by them, the audience will buy in.”

Some Tech Has to Catch Up With Ideas

Linklater may be motivated by new stories, but sometimes he has to wait for technology to catch up to them. “I spend time digging into certain characters. If that necessitates some kind of new technology and a new way to tell a story, then I want to see if that could work.” Linklater says he’d been thinking about the idea that turned into the film, Waking Life, for about 20 years. “It never worked as a film in my head–technologically speaking–until I saw this animation coming together that some friends of mine were developing. It was one of those similar ‘aha’ moments” ‘Oh, that crazy film I’ve been thinking about just doesn’t work live-action, and it wouldn’t be an animated film. But this thing is a hybrid. It’s real and a construct. Kind of like a dream.’ The technology allowed me to tell that story the way I wanted to tell it.”

Plot Matters Less Than People Think

“I’m a big designer. When I write a screenplay, I’ve diagrammed the architecture of the story. There’s really got to be a structure; art demands it. I care more about structure, less about plots. Anything plot-driven feels a little more man-made, more manufactured. I’m always going toward something that’s a little more true to life.”

writerofscreen

writerofscreen:

"Sticker shock aside, there are a few major takeaways from the numbers below—but before we dive into the numbers, it’s important to remember that these numbers are simply minimums. Savvy agents will negotiate a far higher payday for their clients, both on their weekly salaries as well as their rate for writing a specific episode. The minimums are also far closer to the actual payday for staff writers, but once you get to a level higher than staff writer (story editor, executive story editor, producer, etc.), the minimum amount of payment is far lower than what you’ll generally be paid: they solely exist to prevent a network from lowballing a writer far below their paygrade."